Can Bitcoin change the world?

About two billion people around the world do not use banking services. In some cases, it may be because it was dangerous for them to reveal their identity to their government. An online cryptocurrency account could help billions of people around the world. Imagine the possibility of having an online pseudo-digital identity where you do not have to reveal your legal name, where this string of numbers represents who you are legally. Several countries that have had problems with their own banking and monetary systems are already using bitcoin. Greece, Syria and Venezuela are notable examples. Right now, all that a person really needs is an internet connection and a mobile phone, we can send him a fraction of a bitcoin, and within five minutes, this person has $20 on his phone. The bitcoin boom is seen as a survival, not a speculation, in Venezuela and even for those living in countries like Canada where our banking system is relatively stable, tracking information still has benefits. We want our taxes to be used wisely; we do not want the money to be diverted in any way. So imagine if the government had a big book where you and I, Canadian citizens, could see where our federal taxes go and how they are used. When we talk about disruption, we have to realize that disruption involves change, and change can be painful in some respects, but overall it is extremely beneficial.

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